DRY - Don’t Repeat Yourself. These are words that resonate with everyone - regardless of your job title or role. In other words, you want to avoid doing the same tasks over, and over, and over again …

In this module let’s review common Best Practices that FLOGRAMMERS use to build scalable and repeatable solutions!


Course Material


DRY - Don’t Repeat Yourself. These are words that resonate with everyone - regardless of your job title or role. In other words, you want to avoid doing the same tasks over, and over, and over again …

In this module let’s review common Best Practices that FLOGRAMMERS use to build scalable and repeatable solutions!

Scalable and Repeatable FLOs

Building scalable and repeatable FLOs isn’t hard. Let’s review some of the ways that experienced FLOGRAMMERS accomplish this.

1 - Scalable FLOs are Generic

Simply put, this means that such FLOs are configurable and customizable. Well-design FLOs should have a minimum number of steps.

  • You may initially create a FLO that’s more complex or necessary
  • You may start by cloning a FLOPack from someone else (or our library)

The key is to iterate and ask yourself, “How can I make this simpler?” Chances are, after you understand your Use Case you’ll be able to find better ways to simplify your FLOs.

2 - Human Readable

Again, think about a couple things:

  • Will someone else (not me) use this FLO?
  • If I don’t look at this FLO for 6 months, a year, or more - will I remember what it does?

In other words, time that you invest to Document what the FLO is doing is well worth the effort.

3 - Have reusable parts and are easy to monitor

Clearly it’s helpful to have FLOs which perhaps use modular, well-designed child or helper FLOs and are designed in such a way that you can easily understand / monitor execution.

4 - Are flexible

For those of you with one environment, this is less an issue, but if you’re developing FLOs in a larger organization you will likely have MULTIPLE environments to allow for testing.

So in short you should think about making it so that your FLO can easily to switch from test to production!

Make it Generic

Let’s go back to point 1 - Make it Generic!

Veteran FLOGRAMMERS will share their “trick”: Create a generic object before passing fields into a FLO

Why? One lesson that we learn by merit of interacting with a wide number of Applications across many customers is this: Every single instance is different!

Like you see in the image below, we’ve created an Object >> Construct card.

With this, if you’re copying a FLO (say from a FLOPack or elsewhere) - you can simple delete and re-map fields to this one card.

Without using this “trick”, you’re left with the alternative where you’ll need to drag fields the their appropriate places throughout the FLO.

If you’re a Partner or you’re working as part of a team, we strongly recommend making a point of implementing this use of Object Mapping as part of your process!

Easy-to-Use: FLO Pack Handling

If you’re - again - working as part of a team across (perhaps) multiple orgs then FLO Packs are an amazing way to share your work and quickly migrate from one org to another.

Here are some suggestions:

1 - Build Template FLOs in a “Core Org”

If you’re in an organization that has multiple instances where you build FLOs, you should have a single “source of truth” where your team develops. This way everything is created and tested in a central location.

2 - Naming conventions are important!

Just like we explained about documenting your FLOs (making human readable), if you’re working with other FLOGRAMMERS you should use standard naming conventions.

Module 203 - Designer Best Practices - reviews this in detail.

3 - Keep all parent and child FLOs in same folder

Similarly important, we advise you to keep all related parent and child FLOs in same folder. Folders are a fantastic way to “keep everything together”.

This way, that they retain parent/child relationships on when you go to EXPORT them.

If you use a Shared Folder, any clones will retain mappings so this is a great best practice.

4 - Import Into Shared Folder

Finally, we recommend doing any FLO Pack imports into a shared folder so all org members by default have access.

Conversely, you could create new folder and apply permissions to appropriate people.

FLO Pack Export & Import

  • Accessing Export/Import
    • Select the gear next to the folder for sharing options
  • Export
    • Select export
    • FLO Pack download dialog opens
    • Select download
  • Import
    • Navigate to the folder where you want to import the file
    • Select import

Reusable Parts and Easy to Monitor

There are a number of things that you can do to “future proof” your work. Overall, you certainly want to minimize how often you are setting up the same set of cards or setting certain kinds of inputs.

1 - Create an Error Notification System with Routing

If you’re managing a large (airquotes) “ecosystem” of FLOs, you may find a lot of value in creating an error notification system that routes certain kinds of messages to a single location.

For example, if you have multiple Orgs where you build and run FLOs (particularly if you’re a Partner) you may direct messages (like Slack) to a single org. That way your team always knows where to find images and you have a single source of truth.

2 - Create Child FLOs within a Set of FLOs

You’ll want to do this, particularly if same set of cards are commonly called.

3 - Cross-Org Child FLOs

You can call Child FLOs across orgs!

A great use case behind this is if same set of cards are called across different solutions.

4 - Set Global System Values

Again, particularly if you’re managing FLOs across different environments you may want to take advantage of storing standard values in a common place.

For example, Azuqua tables are great ways to store commonly-used values.

As we talked about previously, you could also leverage Child FLOs to pull this information.

Summary

As we close this section, remember that these are only suggestions - but ones informed by a lot of hands-on experience. Just like developers do with code, great FLOGRAMERS always take some time to think about how to scale and make repeatable solutions.